Lyon Speaks For Itself

     Interim photos on two topics: 1) Lyon’s wonderful tradition of frescoes and murals on large and small building walls; and 2) Political posters around town (hint: les Lyonnais are not focused on Drumph). Also, can’t not have a photo of food.

Three little Lyonnaise kids eating their croissants on a lovely Saturday morning. The French are proud of their relatively high (for white Europeans) birth rate and the city is full of kids and families.

Three little Lyonnais kids eating their croissants on a lovely Saturday morning in a small plaza in the middle of the city. The French are proud of their relatively high (for white Europeans) birth rate and the city is full of kids and families.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Murals and Frescoes

There are so many of these–big, small, painterly, more graffiti-like, funny, lovely. It’s a treat to walk around the discover them.

There are many like this too--this one is a window into a person's brain.

There are many like this–this one is a window into a person’s brain.

 

Part of much larger mural, this bit is a bookstore window.

Part of much larger mural on a 10 story building, this bit is a bookstore window. Not related to the one below.

 

This one is near our apartment. What's painted and what's real?

This one is near our apartment. What’s painted and what’s real?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There are many more, but enough for now.

Political Posters

I think I’ve posted a few of these already, but here’s three more: one on European politics, one on women’s rights and one on the refugees.

Here's a good one about the effect of the austerity measures on "solving" Europe's problems.

Here’s a good one about the effect of the austerity measures on “solving” Europe’s problems.

March 8 is International Women's Day. Much of the world celebrates it, but I don't the US.

March 8 is International Women’s Day. This poster is on those 3-way ad displays you see at bus stops. Much of the world celebrates International Women’s Day, but I don’t think the US.

This one is about opening the borders for the refugees. I like the image of the scissors and the victory sign cutting the barbed wire.

This one is about opening the borders for the refugees. I like the image of the scissors and the victory sign cutting the barbed wire.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2 thoughts on “Lyon Speaks For Itself

  1. Returning from Tunisia to Europe, I changed trains or buses in Lyon in February 2013. The headline in that day’s newspapers was that Klaus Barbie, the Butcher of Lyon, had been arrested the day before.

  2. Right that the Nazi Klaus Barbie wreaked terror and torture on the French resistance here in Lyon. Also in many other places. After the war he went to the US, hired by the US government to help in the cold war. Apparently the US refused to allow him to be extradited to France, and instead helped him escape to Bolivia, where he was involved in various dirty tricks, including, possibly, the capture of Che Guevara. When the Bolivian government changed, it allowed France to extradite him to stand for war crimes. He was convicted in 1987 and died in a Lyon prison in 1991. At least that’s what Wikipedia says.

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